Dessert Museum’s aesthetic taught me a thing or two in life

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  • Post category:Features / Life
  • Post last modified:24 March 2020

Hi guys! I’ll be sharing photos from my visit at The Dessert Museum last year.

I checked the EXIF details and it’s dated one year ago from the time I have posted this, so it’s just right to share these with you, especially that we’re at a critical time of our lives.

As with most of my visits, I came in alone (but not lonely). I got a discounted pass here as the Museum is changing one of its rooms to a different theme.

I have a thing for sweets and snacks, but as I grow old comes the responsibility of tending to your own body. I’m that kind of person who doesn’t want to struggle with pain, more so have a sense of pain.

It’s not that we wanted to be pained, but it’s something that we need. Recognizing pain is recognizing what needs to be taken care of.

The marshmallow area felt kind of scattered, which is probably the point altogether. Life is made of scattered pieces – moments, keepsakes (nudge) – that help us become who and what we are today.

In that sense, not all marshmallows are sweet. Some can be too sweet and can be quite stingy.

This photo reminds me of what Casey Neistat has said in one of his videosTime is not equal. The older you get, the faster it moves. This is true.

A decade ago, I’m a simple kid who does not follow trends and tries to make my own media empire. I blink my eyes to realize the connections I made over the years.

I have been reaping the fruits of my labor for the past three years since I joined the events industry. True enough, having a job is another chapter in life. It’d be the Chapter 3 of my life’s book – The first chapter were the times I was just playing at the sidewalk, followed by schooling (from Grade 1 to College).

In life, you start with a binary sense of the world – a yes and a no, a positive and a negative, friends and enemies.

As you grow older, you learn that things are not just black and white. Previously, you classify people as friends or enemies, but as you learn a thing or two about empathy, and you think to yourself that they’re not that bad at all. Vice-versa.

You also learn that you can’t have the best of people when you don’t want their worst. This is normal.

Being curious of things led me to know both sides of the coin. This does not exempt me from getting all the bad stuff, stepping into the wrong territory, acting like I wasn’t supposed to, lahat na.

As much as you hate to have some, in life, you won’t be excused from having bad raps.

To give you an idea, my life’s theme songs include Gary Jules’ “Mad World” and Sugarfree’s “Hari ng Sablay.” My soundtrack also includes The Yellowjackets’ “The Dream.”

All that I’m thankful for is that I’m alive and well. I’m thankful that I have achieved a point in my life where I’m confident to share my story to all of you. I’m glad that my life is put to good use – this God-given talent, optimism, and the like.

Allow me to share this: I stumbled upon a meme image which reads something like this:

Depression: Go screw yourself.
Me: No, you go screw yourself.

While it is in a meme, it gave me something else.

I also learned to have a thoughtful template for every birthday greeting: “May the best of health and the best of life be with you always.” Always.

If you thought I was supposed to write my thoughts about the Dessert Museum, that’s what I thought too – but to cut it short, please go to the Dessert Museum once this quarantine period ends. I hope they’re still there once things subside.

It’s a great place to express your creativity, as well as to get to know the things you probably don’t know about sweets. Plus points if you’re in a group. Honest.